knowledge is power Last updated - Jan 2003

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 Archive - Sept 2002

     
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Chicago has no east
I'm very proud to know the creative people involved in no-east. Included in this collabortative magazine is a photographic journey of women's bathrooms in Chicago, and a collection of objects found in the street. There isn't any doubt that this city has quite a wealth of talent. If you don't believe me, go see some of it by visiting any of the sites in Chicago weblog list in my sidebar. Yesterday I pointed out two particularly well-written pieces in my weblog discussion blog, which again proves how deep the talent is here.

Linguistics
Hellatine Dictionary of Bureaucratese Brilliant. These words really do belong in the modern vocabulary. I can't wait until I can use imploy, anhingant, ilrelevant or pitio in a sentence. All these words have actual, well-though out etymology. Also see the set of other linguistic links below the definitions and you'll be treated to resources such as An Easy Guide to Swedish Cursing or perhaps the slightly more applicable Linguistic Phenomena/Devices list. Again, found via shifted librarian

Weblogs
Here's a list of interesting blogs I've recently run into:
  • Smart Mobs, a weblog to go along with Howard Rheingold's new book of the same name. Very interesting topical blog. "Smart mobs emerge when communication and computing technologies amplify human talents for cooperation." found via shifted librarian
  • Glass Beads and Complex Problems Another smart topical blog of one of the Smart Mob blog contributors.
  • dooce the woman who lost her job because of her blog restarts it.
  • sourmash with a twist, diary of an ineligible bachelor. Chicago blog instantly goes on my list for his Open Letter to Blogdom "3. Enough already with the animated icons. What are you fifteen frigging years old? You are? Um, sorry. You probably have enough problems. Pay no attention to the bitter old man."

    Fonts
    Antenna has pointed us to a wonderful font finding tool Fontscape "An independent directory of typefaces organized into categories" You can find a font depending on application, mood, time period, etc. Very cool. Some of the categories should be a bit more extensive however, for instance the book application category is a bit lacking.

    Here's a few useful font related links that I've been collecting:


    Weblog Program
    On October 5, at 2 pm, at the Sulzer Branch of the Chicago Public Library at 4455 N. Lincoln Ave, I'll be hosting a program on weblogs.

    I'll explain what a weblog is, what types and genres of weblogs exsist, taking the audience on a short tour to a few of my favorites. I'll explain some simple ways to find blogs that you might be interested in, and ways to track them. I'll also briefly cover how to start you own, and offer some tips for running one.

    Now most of you reading this probably already run a weblog, so you say, that's pretty basic what's in it for me? After my rambling, we will have a panel of some smart local webloggers who will discuss what blogging has done for us, what it's done for the Web, and what it can do offline. These and deeper questions will be discussed by a panel which will include AKMA, from AKMA's Random Thoughts, Dan Hartung of Lake Effect, Jim McGee of McGee's Musings. They'll be few more as well.

    So if you're a blogger, a blog reader, or someone interested in starting one, come on out. And let your friends who are thinking of starting one know. If nothing else, this promises to be the largest gathering of Chicago bloggers ever assembled, so come on out and met us.

    In order for my to organize me thoughts for this presentation, jot down notes and links that I'll be covering, and to enable everybody to comment, I've set up another weblog - All About Weblogs. I should mention that I really don't intend to keep that weblog on a permenant basis, so many others do a much better job discussing the happenings in the blog world(links to these others will soon be found at the new weblog) and besides I already run one more blog than I have time for.


    Weblog Update (Who am I kidding, it's a RANT!)
    My AT&T Broadband Cable Internet access at home has now been down for a week. And I'm pissed because it's their fault and they've even admitted it. I've paid for almost the whole year in advance to make sure this wouldn't happen and they screw up my account, somehow duplicating it and canceling one of them, thereby killing my service. I've talked to 8 different customer service people, at all levels, and two high level customer service management people (not guys that man the phones, but those who make the policies). Turboing in this situation has done me no good. I've been told I'm on a list of accounts that need to be 'rebuilt'. This list is not the normal list of canceled non-payers, but a list of accounts they screwed up on. This list is so long, they can't estimate how long it's going to take to get through it. No one will tell me when or even if my service will be restored. At least they've stopped lying to me about 1-3 business days. I am now in the process of researching the network tech people's identities so I can bribe them.

    Come on AT&T, How much do you want? I'm desperate here.

    Also I'd like to take this opportunity to withdraw any recommendations I've ever made for using AT&T's Broadband service as a reliable connection. If you don't work at home, and you don't need internet access for your everyday livelyhood, go ahead sign up for their fast service. But if you need to know you'll be able to use the service you've paid for at anytime, and the thought of possible down times of a week or more would be crippling, then find another alternative.

    I've also asked that when (or if) this problem is fixed, I be "made happy" in the form of a month's credit or a totebag or something. I was told it wasn't their policy to 'make their customers happy'. I wish I had recorded that.

    This downtime comes at a bad time since I need to spend some serious online time putting together a Weblog Program to be given at a Northside branch of the Chicago Public Library. I'll announce the details very shortly, but it looks like we have a very smart panel of 'prominent' local webloggers to discuss what we get out of doing this.


    Weblogs
    A few good chicago blogs found:
    • sliozis.com Includes "a short but mildly entertaining collection of all my Domo-kun usage", Khan (as in wrath of) answers the Friday Five. Domo-kun also answers the Friday five from a couple of weeks ago.
    • Pop Culture Gadabout Actually from Normal "Pop cultural criticism - plus the occasional socio/political commentary"
    • degipi.net It's good to see that there are still weblogs out there that link to interesting pieces of knowledge on the Web. Without such weblogs we wouldn't know that there's a site that explains how to glue one thing to another - This to That


    September 11, 2002
    KIPlog is 3 years old this month, and in 3 years I have never added a visible date to any post. I do so today to remind us of the date. Rememberances of the events will be pounded into us today, and in fact on every day for years to come.

    Remember the day and the events, but let's not wallow in it.

    Let's understand all the details and comprehend it's scope, scale and the effect it has had on us, but don't let it freeze us in our tracks because we stop to stare at it as it plays over and over in our heads and on our screens. Let the images fire us up and give us a powerful resolve, but let's not stare at it so long that we develop an unhealthy fascination with it.

    Let's become more protective and cautious, but let's not be so bulked up by fear that we forget what we're protecting. Let's apply the mighty force of the most powerful nation on earth not to punish, but to eliminate the enemy who did this, but let's not be so enraged and revengeful that we'd collateral damage unthinkable numbers of civilian casualties and invoke even more suicidal rage from the enemy. Let's protect ourselves from terrible wars in the future by eliminating potentially deadly enemies, but without causing a terrible war in the present.

    Again, remember the day, the events, the people, but don't let it consume us.



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